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.org/possibilities. >>> tomorrow, the supreme court will begin hearing arguments in two of the biggest civil rights cases to reach its docket in years, if not in decades. up for consideration, doma, the so-called defense of marriage act, and california's proposition 8. as the court prepares for an historic moment, more public figures are weighing in. we can now add senator claire mccaskill of missouri and senator mark warner of virginia to the growing number of current and former lawmakers throwing their support behind marriage equality. senator mccaskill wrote, "i have come to the conclusion that our government should not limit the right to marry based on who you love. while churches should never be required to conduct marriages outside of their religious beliefs, neither should the government tell people who they have a right to marry." senator mark warner announced his support for marriage equality in a facebook post. "i support marriage equality because it is the fair and right thing to do." one of the two lawyers arguing against california's prop 8, david boyce, has predicted vark victory. >> i think we're g
nixon and eisenhower it was a civil rights party of lincoln and the the democrats -- >> jackie robinson. >> and martin luther king was a big supporter until they had a bad moment when nixon didn't come to his aid. nixon was working in the senate and lobbied for a stronger version of the 1967 bill that was a landmark bill at the time, so they were very different parties and the leaders of the party there was a liberal and conservative wing so to speak, the conservative wing, people like robert taft, he was an isolationist but he supported the pensions. he had a real social conscience and so on. there were out fliers to the trustees six out fliers in the country and there was senator mccarthy but they were out fliers to be dated and speak with authority, and in fact even though eisenhower was reluctant to take anybody on directly, she felt he did want to get mccarthy from the party that put next-gen up to it. >> one of the challenges for someone writing about richard nixon i think, i would like to know if you share this view, that we have an ocean of information about him as president lar
in the civil rights division and found perez gave misleading public testimony when he said in 2010 that political appointees cannot make the decisions to drop prosecution of the new black panther party members. you can read that whole story in politico this morning. to want get to your calls though on this subject of the changes in the republican party, this plan for more outreach, scheduled changes with the conventions and primary. al sect next from colorado. good morning, alec. caller: yes, good morning. i think that rand paul did really well at cpac, and marco rubio is pretty good as well. i just want to say that people like mccain, they served honorably in the military and stuff like that. however, it is time for a change, a new kind of republican party that can reach out to a lot more people. the demographics of america changed, i guess it's a little bit more moderate now. it used to be a center-right nation, and now it's probably center-left, so we probably do need to move the needle toward the center a little bit. as for rand paul, i really do like the fact that he had that
me if i am wrong, i don't recall you ever complaining about ministers who were involved in the civil rights movement or the anti-vietnam war demonstrations or about black creators who have been so involved in american politics. is it all conservative that you object to? >> no, what i object to -- [applause] >> -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek the power of government to impose it on others. >> at that time, diane sawyer was there. you were there. it is interesting that those two men, especially mr. mondale, agreed that you and diane sawyer could be on the panel. >> yeah and jim was the other one from "the new york daily news." >> i was certainly surprised. >> i was a reporter for "the baltimore sun" and covered the national politics. i was also, by then, i had gotten more interested in politics, and i was writing a press column for "the american spectator" magazine. >> conservative? >> conservative. and i guess the mondale people didn't recognize that. i think my questions were very fair. i like mond
their candidate. on the right, southern white democrats who were against civil rights, they were being peeled off to vote for george wallace, the symbol of proud segregation. also, different problem for the democrats. people hated the vietnam war. and the president at the time was a democrat, lyndon b. johnson. so if you were against the war, as most americans at that point were -- this is the gallop polling on the war -- the number of people who thought it was a mistake -- if you were against the war as increasingly everybody was, you were so the psyched to vote for lbj's successor. so the democrats were losing their appeal in the south because of racism, and they were losing the anti-war vote. the republican candidate tried to take advantage of that split, and was this handsome devil. nixon in 1968 was running against a democratic party that he knew was split. he was, in response, pledging to get rid of the draft. and he claimed to have a plan to end the war. he argued that if you wanted the war to end, you needed to elect him. you needed to vote the democrats out of office because clearly lbj
and there was a time civil-rights, universal rights was the providence of federal government and local government got in the way as we all know in the 60s federal troops escorted african-americans into state and local universities in the south because mayors of places like little rock were a big part of the problem but nowadays that has changed in fundamental ways and i know longer see the central government as a friend of progress toward justice and for real opponent of big money. i see cities as better able to do that and it seems to me big money thinks big government is really the place it wants to operate. the reason big money isn't on the side of the tea party ultimately is they don't need to make big government smaller. they can buy it and own it and put it to their own uses and that is harder to do nowadays in the city's. a quick word. mayor bloomberg, a lot of mayors about whom we can argue, talked about some of the things we have problems, i had problems with bloomberg's change of the city constitution taking a third term and had problems with the weight he brought people into the school sys
predicting that promise for everybody because of his life. as a civil rights attorney rightsan aide senator ted kennedy, a member of montgomery county's county council, he has helped level playing field where working families can get ahead. this is not chosen -- this is not the first time he was chosen to be a labor secretary. we have governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed, as the secretary of maryland's labor department, where heat implemented the first living wage law. le, he has open pathways for everyone willing to contribute, including people with disabilities withlbgt americans, and immigrants. while he has tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has spent a career as a consensus builder. he has worked with federal, state, and local government levels, and he understands our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have security they need on the job, a democratic voice in the workplace, everybody playing by the same set of word -- rules strict he will make an outstanding secretary of labor, and there are plenty of work to do. we will h
. this is not democracy. this is not freedom. >> right. >> what is it? >> what it is is first of all we set this thing up to where we supported the shiites and the sunnis are now -- there is going to be a version of a civil war. right now, as we speak here live on cnn there is an alternate reality on another network. they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> yes. i don't really want to, you know, disparage. >> let me read this tweet from donald rumsfeld. the iraqis deserve our respect and appreciation. >> he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney are walking the streets. the way they are trying to revise history saying it was a mistake or we were given bad information. say nobody sent me an e-mail or a tweet that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement they havethey are holding them there. i tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find no kids many n the basement? of course, you would think i would want to go after goldman sachs as bush wanted to go after saddam.
of the olympic medalist don carlos discuss their personal experiences during the civil-rights movement live at the virginia festival of the book, saturday at 8:00 eastern, part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> on washington journal, we spoke with members of congress about the federal budget. we heard from house budget committee vice-chairman tom price and jerrold nadler. this is an hour. host: now joining us is representative tom price, vice chair of the budget committee. also a member of the ways and means tax writing committee. if you would, start by bringing us up to date on where the house is when it comes to the continuing resolution to the 2014 budget. guest: the budget was passed out of the house a couple of weeks ago. the senate has been dealing with that. is the pathanding that last evening. it is back in the house and people like the past that today. it is good news. one of the things we included with the approach with spending reductions. the budget is an exciting activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of repr
slavery and the civil rights movement into today. for generations that helped people persevere and holding on to hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in different parts of the world and ithout firm roots, the story spoke for a urining for every human being for home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and the gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle. just like previous generations have. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed "i may not get there with you, but i want you to know we as a people will get to the promise land." [applause] so just as joshua carried on after mow says the work goes -- moses the work goes on for all of you for justice, opportunity, for freedom. for the jewish people the journey of the promise of the the state of israel wound through
of democracy and human rights and civil society, outside its own borders now for 200 years, just took on anmpossible taskn iraq. it just wasn't going to acceptst that. and i would say much more likely than that the american-- tank american influence will be incremental improvements in what is now a pretty dire situation, is that it's very likely to get worse, and lead to civil war, and it's not even clear that the most fundamental issue:00 is who governs in iraq, the majority shi'a, or the minority sunni, it's not even clear that that's, a settled issue, and if isn't a settled issue, and the sunnise prevail inyriand back theirl brothers across the borders of iraq and anbar, you may very well see a civil war, at least as brutal as we were witnessing in 2007 at the time time of the surge. >> rose: we will come back to manies thof point. >> or beloved late friend richard holbrooke once asked me. what did i think? what was my sounded bite about this war. i said we will did due course learn whether it was an open success or -- >> noble. >> he object toltd notification of noble failure.ct h
very much. a lot of debate about this rule. right? >> abc 7 sports direct jer here. there is another rule change that fans have been waiting for. >> yes. and let's just put this into perspective. worst rule in history of modern civil saigs. and raider fans january 19th, 2002 is the day at patriots were handed a gift by the refs. now after a decade, nfl decided not that is a dumb rule. you snow a snowy night tom brady started to tlo. pulled a ball back. hit by charles woodson and fumbled. silver and black in position to win this game. the refs pulled out the tuck rule saying any intentional forward movement of the arm starts a forward pass this, is the way he read it f the player loses possession of the ball attempting to tuck it back they called it incompete pass. patriots got a field goal, went on to win that game. then, went on to win super bowl starting their new england dynasty. new rule is if a quarterback loses control of a ball. it's a fumble like we knew it was. today raiders tweeted adios, tuck rule. it took 11 years to overturn what is one of the most absurd rules ever crea
in studio with us. chris moody from yahoo! younews, eric will be joining us at the half. >> all right. >> bill: a story just crossed the wires. there is really a civil war among republicans in the nation's capitol these days, and meanwhile there is a lot of talk about how and if they can possibly rebuild. bloomberg is reporting this morning that back in the primaries in february 2012 when things didn't look so good for mitt romney, and he still had a lot of opposition from the crazies in the party, rick santorum, and newt gingrich, actually were engaged in very serious conversations about forming a unity ticket to knock romney out. >> are you sure that's not an onion story? >> bill: it sounds like it doesn't. romney -- i mean rick santorum and newt gingrich. >> oh wow. you have got to be kidding me. what do you really say about that? can you imagine a more bizarre ticket. you have got newt wanting to putting basis on the moon -- >> bill: i can imagine michelle balkman and herman cane. >> that would have been an interesting race. >> bill: but this question -- i
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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